Per centum sign, Ampersand, Hash, Question mark, Exclamation point, Star, Six Images of Agony

I’m not going to write some narrative conveying a tale, I’m just going to, as requested, let the images speak for themselves and see what feelings they’ll bring to life in you. Now, I still feel I have to convey what kind of thoughts and words come to my mind viewing these images (or shooting them be truthful). I’d be bold enough to quote Green Day and “Just f***ing swear a lot.” So here is me cursing, embracing these painful six images of agony, and just in case this blog doesn’t approve of my colourful language, I won’t say it, I’ll just spell it out: Per centum sign, ampersand, hash, question mark, exclamation point, star.

Per centum sign
Ampersand
Hash
Question mark
Exclamation point
Star

 

//Christoffer

What “Why” to find in days to come

The context of my life has changed. Because of this I found myself asking: what am I doing? where am I going? I have discovered a part of me in need of an inner journey of knowing myself, a journey that makes use of two passions that lie close to my heart – photography and writing. Continue reading What “Why” to find in days to come

Imagine a Tale – Us nerds

Sunrise. Vaxholm castle or to be more exact N 59.403056 E 18.359722 WGS84, Sweden, and the morning gathering of the #baltictoysafari, a bunch of nerds hunting the first light with their cameras at the ready and figures waiting to pose. Continue reading Imagine a Tale – Us nerds

Ex nihilo nihil fit

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. A monument of grand stature in the middle of a desert, surrounded by miles and miles of sand, canyons and sunshine, this setting is what I missed last time there was an official gathering of toy photographers. An opportunity I was sad to see pass me by. Continue reading Ex nihilo nihil fit

East-Mountain

“Welding” by Christoffer Östberg

Why?

Why do I spend the majority of my free time photographing small pieces of colourful plastic?
I first tried the ultimate answer to any question and realized 42 wouldn’t cut it at all (although going Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy with LEGO is definitely a challenge I have to visit someday, without panic). At first this question may have seemed easy enough and the answer self evident, but looking deeper, there’s nothing simple about it. What are our personal reasons for taking photographs? The answer is different for all of us. It can be as simple as love, a story that needs to be told, or a way to revisit childhood.
I have only been active in LEGO photography for a year now, and still my reasons have changed during this time.
My wife is a professional photographer and so I have always had her support and knowledge. I have also found many talented and inspiring photographers out there. Even though I have changed the way I photograph, Vesa Lethimäki will always stand as a source of inspiration. I promised always to challenge myself in photography and find new ways to play with these bricks, to cast away the innate limitations and bring them to life, sometimes with the help of the four elements. Especially close to my heart are those pictures involving fire and natural light. It’s about not having control of the situation, acting within a limited time frame with the camera to capture that which is unpredictable, be it fire, wind, water, or earth. What I appreciate about the unpredictable photographs is that they capture a moment in time, impossible or almost impossible to reproduce, triggering a realistic cinematic feeling.
Alexander Rodchenko said, “One has to take several different shots of a subject, from different points of view and in different situations, as if one examined it in the round rather than looked through the same key-hole again and again.” There are endless perspectives on the simplest of objects, and all of them tell a different story.
But there are other reasons besides the joy of drowning figures or setting them on fire. The main reason still stands: I am a father of two kids who love playing and being creative with LEGO. Much inspiration is drawn from them; the imaginary mind of the young knows no boundaries.
I found that even though I strive to make all photographic effects in front of the camera, with as little post-processing as possible, my goal now, almost a year later, is to express my emotional response to the scene. This has led me to modify the image captured by the camera. If I did not alter the image, I would be showing what the camera captured, not what I saw and felt in my head. Even so, I still work more with the camera rather than post-production software.
There is a story behind every image, and it is a great feeling when my family and I decide to frame one of them and hang it on the wall. The images may seem uninteresting to people, but to me they are a reminder of what ideas spawned in my mind and what emotion stirred them to life.
So why do I keep doing this, day in and day out, sacrificing sleep and mental health. I think George Bernard Shaw said it best: “We don’t stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.I don’t want to grow old.

“Mono Wheel” by Christoffer Östberg

“River Crossing” by Christoffer Östberg