Listen, look on your desk, and pilfer!

Monday morning: Arrive at work…URGGH! Coffee. Sit at my desk and get lost in James’ latest podcast. Catch up on the weekend’s Toy Photographers posts. Panic that I don’t have a post written for the week. Scramble. Pilfered Ideas James’ post about expanding his toy photographing subject matter beyond what …

Season of Change

Autumn is here for those of us in the Northern hemisphere, and I must admit that I’ve been hit with a strong case of Seasonal Infectious Disorder! Fall is my favorite time of year, and I’ve already begun to see the change of season reflected in my photography. Fall signifies …

Review: LEGO 40260 Halloween Haunt

It’s officially Fall, which of course means that it’s that time of year where we’re inundated with Halloween goodies. Decorations, costumes, pumpkin flavored drinks and treats, scary movies, and as it turns out, LEGO sets! I considered saving my review of LEGO’s new seasonal kit, 20460 Halloween Haunt, for later …

When in Doubt, Accessorize!

When Shelly discussed her love of shooting in threes, I decided to take a look at my own catalog of images to see if there were similar patterns in my own work. Luckily, one quickly emerged: accessorizing. Rather than bring together several elements to make a photo work, I sometimes …

10 Reasons Why Toys are Fascinating

I’ve been studying various sources to get snippets about why toys are so fascinating to toy photographers and the general public alike. So far I’ve absorbed On Longing by Susan Stewart, The Poetics of Space by Gaston Bechelard, the documentary Marwencol, and various videos, articles and artist statements by and about …

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes

I tried something different. I tried to apply some “real” photography techniques to my toyphotography. Conditions and time restraints warranted a change in the way I usually operate. The images I managed to capture were met with a very loud and very apparent “Meh” across the various social media sites …

The problem with Star Wars

In Shelly’s post “The problems with Chima” she pointed out that there is a benefit, for us as still life photographers, to work with toys  that have a well-known back-story.  We can use them as symbols and let the back-story work for us in the picture. I try to do …

The details makes the picture

Since I read Chris McVeigh´s post “Photography is a road trip”, I have been thinking about the difference between creating pictures with toys compared with creating photographs with people. I do both; I’m a still life photographer with toys as my main motive, as well as a portrait–photographer. Doing both has made …