How can we grow as photographers – my new years resolution

We talked earlier about “the rules of photography” on the blog and I think I have made my point that I like to bend the “rules”. Or as some of you have pointed out, there are no rules, only conventions that we use when we make our pictures. Continue reading How can we grow as photographers – my new years resolution

Reflections on a different kind of photo challenge

I have to start my reflections on the photo challenge that Shelly presented on December 6th by being frank and tell you the truth: I don’t like writing about my pictures. I believe strongly that my pictures should be able to stand by themselves. Words are much stronger then pictures and we’re trained to take in the words before the picture so I tend to be rather moderate in my writing. So this challenge  was difficult for me and I wouldn’t have chosen if for myself, so thank you Shelly for getting me out of my comfort zone. Continue reading Reflections on a different kind of photo challenge

The problem with Star Wars

In Shelly’s post “The problems with Chima” she pointed out that there is a benefit, for us as still life photographers, to work with toys  that have a well-known back-story.  We can use them as symbols and let the back-story work for us in the picture. I try to do that in most of my pictures, because for me the roles that these figures play in my photographs are to be symbols. There is also a problem with toys with a well know back-story, in my case the problem is Star Wars. Continue reading The problem with Star Wars

I would vote for Seattle

I know that we already had a vote for the next location for the US toy-photo-safari, and we came up with Chicago as the winner (60/40). I really like Chicago, but after a week in Seattle with Shelly as my host, I have to say that you might want to reconcider and put your vote on Seattle instead.

Continue reading I would vote for Seattle

The details makes the picture

Since I read Chris McVeigh´s post “Photography is a road trip”, I have been thinking about the difference between creating pictures with toys compared with creating photographs with people. I do both; I’m a still life photographer with toys as my main motive, as well as a portrait–photographer. Doing both has made me realize that I use a lot of my still life experiences in my work with living models. Like working with my body to visualize the idea, and using my hands to arrange my models (toys and people). But there are some differences in working with a plastic model compared to working with a living model. I do mean the most obvious – that people live and breath and that my toys are plastic and relativly static. Continue reading The details makes the picture

Are you the toy-photographer I’m looking for?

I have read them all, the rules of photography. You have probably heard of most of them: The rule of thirds, placing focus on the eye closest to the viewer, focusing on your main motive, placing the negative space in front of the subject and not behind it, using a tripod when practicing macro-photography so you don’t get the picture unfocused because of your hand shaking and so on. I am guessing that you to have read at least one or two blog posts about these as well.

I know most of the rules of photography by heart. I use them when I take pictures, and knowing them makes me more comfortable as a photographer. Maybe it’s true that once you know the rules you can break them, but I´m not so sure. Because the theory only works if the viewer also knows the rules and knows that you’re breaking them. How do I know, that they know, the rules? If a viewer sees a blurry picture do they stay long enough to understand the picture or do they just ignore it as another picture that is lacking focus…

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From my point of view there is a thrill in pictures that play with the rules. I like the idea of breaking the rules, and making “the wrong” – right! When I look at photos, I like looking at pictures that are hard to read, and I love to try to figure out if the photographer intended it to be that way, or if it just happened, by chance. I like it when a photographer intentionally challenges me and makes it difficult for me as viewer to get in to the picture. Not knowing the rules and just breaking them doesn’t intrigue me, but doing it on purpose makes me want to dig deeper in to the work of that photographer. I have a hard time finding toy-photographers that work with that idea of making “the wrong” – right!

I would like to see more toy-pictures break the rules and make a point of it, but I haven’t found many yet. Maybe you know where I should look. If you do, please let me now.

Kristina

For whom?

What part does the viewer play in the art of photography? What do you want the viewer to see?  When I wrote my blog post “Why” the other day, I got a question from Reggie about how to get a bigger audience for once toy-photographs. And that got me reflecting on “for whom am I doing this?”

And what part does the audience play in my photography? Continue reading For whom?

It seems like a dream…

I have always done my toy photography by myself, on the street, on the beach, in the puddles and i’m used to be alone, and having people stoping asking me:

What I’m doing, if I’m alright, or if I need a lift, or some help…

Continue reading It seems like a dream…