Draconis Occidentalis: Unearthing the Beast

The location was only believed to be legend – mentioned only in stories and folklore. After many years of research, the land was finally found. Forgotten by time a great beast lay dormant, encapsulated by earth, waiting to be discovered. Upon arrival, the seekers were welcomed by a great fog, presumably a bad omen. The men, driven by determination, carried on; for what lies beneath would certainly be the most significant find in paleontological history.

Nikolaus James

 

It Never Gets Old

I confess, I like taking photographs of T-Rex chasing little helpless mini figures; it never gets old.

Whenever I set up one of these shots I snicker and I’m happy. If I can’t make myself laugh, then how can I make you? If I can’t please myself with my photography, why should I expect you to like them? So here we are, it’s Monday and I’ve posted yet another one of these silly photos and my day got a little better. Continue reading It Never Gets Old

Assembling the #toydinosquad

When I started posting photos of toy dinosaurs on Instagram I was alone. I searched through any hashtag I could think of to try and find anyone doing what I was doing. The big toy photography group pages we’re filled with Stormtroopers, Super Heroes and Lego, but no other prehistoric creatures. I would get comments like “Original idea!” which was nice to hear, but reinforced how out on my own I was. Or so I thought. Continue reading Assembling the #toydinosquad

take me back to the paleolithic era!

i recently had the good fortune to interview one of the LEGO designers behind the new jurassic world line-up (look for that piece in the upcoming issue of Bricks). and it rekindled my childhood love of dinosaurs.

as a kid, i loved hunting for fossils out at the river (the river being the missouri). i found various shells and plant bits in the shale and marveled that they might be as old as 60 million years, even tho’ i couldn’t really even grasp that number.

i always insisted that we stop at every touristy rock shop in the black hills and i scoured the ground on scorching summer days in the badlands of south dakota, hoping to find a tooth from a saber-toothed tiger. i dreamed of being a paleontologist, but abandoned those dreams early, thinking that everything would already be discovered by the time i grew up (back then, growing up seemed so impossibly far away).

i thrilled when i read of the discovery of sue, the most intact t-rex fossil ever found – you guessed it – in south dakota. (so i was kind of right, all the good stuff was already discovered.) i loved that sue ended up at chicago’s field museum, where i could visit her, since i was living there at the time. and although i moved to denmark before she was up and on display, i did go back and visit her a time or two anyway. and she is magnificent.

all of this came flooding back after my interview with nick and i had to get me some dinosaurs. now, on these long, light summer evenings, i can lay on my belly in the grass in our back yard, posing my raptors and my dilophosaurus in the glorious golden light and dreaming of all those fossils out there, yet to be found.

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65 Million Years Ago …

In the beginning I had absolutely no idea what I was doing.

I had been working on a dinosaur-themed comic book and purchased a few toy dinosaurs to help with anatomical designs. The Allosaurus was first, but soon followed by a Triceratops and a Velociraptor. All made by the French brand, Papo.

They had almost no articulation, but the detail of the sculpt and paintwork were unparalleled. That’s what really caught my attention, the realism of the figures. Continue reading 65 Million Years Ago …