The Basics – How to Buy a Camera

I can’t believe I’m writing this post. But I was asked nicely, so how could I say no?

Before I get started I want to be very clear, I’m not an equipment geek, I don’t collect cameras and I don’t like to sit around and talk gear. I’m sure it’s lots of fun, but I would rather talk content than technical specifications any day. Continue reading The Basics – How to Buy a Camera

The Basics – Depth of Field

You’ve probable heard the term ‘depth of field’ or DoF thrown about a lot in respect to toy photography. If you’re not familiar with the term, it’s simply how much of the image, from front to back, that is in focus. The size of this plane of focus is determined by how big or small your aperture is. Continue reading The Basics – Depth of Field

Leveling Up With LEGO

Shooting LEGO minifigs is like a game for me, a quest to improve my photography. I invent personas for these iconic plastic toys, build MOCs for them and create worlds around them. With each photo, I rack up experience points, trying to level up my photography. With each new level achieved, I unlock a new skill: shot setups get more creative, shooting becomes more intuitive, editing goes faster. It’s a fun game, this open-ended free roam game of LEGO photography, and I intend to become a powerful wizard. Continue reading Leveling Up With LEGO

The Basics – Sticky Tack

Sticky Tack or Blu-Tack can be a toy photographers best friend. If you’re not familiar with this amazing substance, it is a little piece of removable gummy substance you can attach to your toy to help with a difficult pose, an uneven surface, an uncooperative accessory or a stiff wind. Continue reading The Basics – Sticky Tack

Outdoor toy photography with intention

I like to create photos like some people like to cook – a little of this, a dash of that, stir the pot and then see what comes out of the oven. While outdoor toy photography definitely has a chance effect about it, similar to experimenting in the kitchen, that doesn’t mean that outdoor photographers, like myself, aren’t crafting our photos with the same attention to detail as all  photographers. Continue reading Outdoor toy photography with intention

Reflectors and how to use them with toys

Every outdoor photographer should have a reflector in their kit and know how to use it while shooting their toys. Why? Because when you shoot outdoors, you only have one light source – the sun, and it’s rarely where you need it. When you add a reflector to your kit you can achieve even lighting on your toy, fill in those deep shadows and eliminate that shiny plastic line so often seen in toy photography. Continue reading Reflectors and how to use them with toys

You can’t just look at the mistakes

On Sunday afternoon I asked my youngest son if he wanted to go out and shoot. After a moment’s hesitation he replied:

-Can I go out by myself?
-Sure, I replied.

I loaded the camera with a charged battery and an empty memory card. He put the toys he wanted to photograph in a bag and went outside. Continue reading You can’t just look at the mistakes

The next challenge – can photographs tell the truth?

It’s my turn to pick a new challenge from The Photographers Playbook. This challenge is called “truth and dare” and is written by Gregory Halpern. The challenge is to

“Make a short series of purely object photographs.”

And what we shall ask our self is if photographs can tell the truth? Or as Halden put’s it:

“We know photographs can “lie”. Is it possible for them to tell the truth?”

I’m really looking forward to see what comes out of this challenge. I’m already wondering: how does a purely objective photograph look like? And can I do one? I don’t know but I’m looking forward to try.